Aging In Place

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Special Guest

Steve Kleber

 Kleber & Associates (K&A)

joins The Housing Hour this week to discuss ‘Aging in Place’. Steve will explore this growing trend and also share some of the latest products and solutions that can be implemented in homes to make a smooth transition for those who opt to ‘age in place’.

“Aging in Place is the ability to live in one’s own home and community safely, independently and comfortably, regardless of age, income or ability level.”

Topics:

Aging in place trends

Construction ideas

Aging in place products and uses

Steve’s Recommendations:

LUXE Linear Drains

Amba Heated Towel Racks

Stream Lab- Smart Water Monitoring System

Tile Doctor

Steve’s Resources:

Living In Place Institute

National Institute on Aging

National Association of Home Builders also offers a comprehensive checklist

Creating Magic with Lee cockerell

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Special Guest

Lee Cockerell

Former Executive Vice President of Operations for the Walt Disney World® Resort

joins The Housing Hour this week to share his legacy of creating the famous Disney Leader Strategies which are used to train and develop thousands of leaders at Walt Disney World.

There is no ‘pixie dust’ involved, these are sound proven leadership techniques that brings the wonderful world of magic to businesses around the globe.

Topics Include

How to Create Corporate Magic

Create an inclusive workplace

How to start each day

plus so much more!!

Lee Cockerell is the former Executive Vice President of Operations for the Walt Disney World® Resort. “As the Senior Operating Executive for ten years Lee led a team of 40,000 Cast Members and was responsible for the operations of 20 resort hotels, 4 theme parks, 2 water parks, a shopping & entertainment village and the ESPN sports and recreation complex in addition to the ancillary operations which supported the number one vacation destination in the world.”

One of Lee’s major and lasting legacies was the creation of Disney Great Leader Strategies which was used to train and develop the 7000 leaders at Walt Disney World. Lee has held various executive positions in the hospitality and entertainment business with Hilton Hotels for 8 years and the Marriott Corporation for 17 years before joining Disney in 1990 to open the Disneyland Paris project.

Lee has served as Chairman of the Board of Heart of Florida United Way, the Board of Trustees for The Culinary Institute of America (CIA), the board of the Production and Operations Management Society and the board of Reptilia a Canadian attractions and entertainment company. In 2005 Governor Bush appointed Lee to the Governor’s Commission on Volunteerism and Public Service for the state of Florida where he served as Chairman of the Board.

He is now dedicating his time to public speaking, authoring a book on leadership, management and service excellence titled, Creating Magic…10 Common Sense Leadership Strategies from a Life at Disney. which is now available in 13 languages and his latest book, The Customer Rules…The 39 Essential Rules for Delivering Sensational Service. Lee also performs leadership and service excellence workshops and consulting for organizations around the world as well as for the Disney Institute. Lee has received the following awards;

  • Golden Chain Award for Outstanding leadership and business performance from the Multi-Unit Foodservice Operations Association (MUFSO).
  • Silver Plate Award for Outstanding Operator in the foodservice industry from the International Foodservice Manufacturers Association (IFMA).
  • Excellence In Production Operations Management and Leadership (POMS) from the Productions and Operations.
  • Grandfather of the year from his three grandchildren, Jullian, Margot and Tristan.

Lee and his wife Priscilla live in Orlando Florida.

Emotional Intelligence and Real Estate Training

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Special Guest

Daniel Park

Keller Williams Realty

The Nic Nicaud Team

joins The Housing Hour this week to share his expert training methods for agents and customers: Emotional Intelligence and Real Estate Training.

Daniel taps his Psychology degree from Clemson University and his close work with Dr. John Townsend and Dr. Henry Cloud to formulate techniques that will help navigate the most complex human experiences during real estate transactions.

Topics Include:

  • Early Business Days in Prague
  • Commercial Real Estate in Texas
  • Emotional Intelligence and Real Estate Training
  • Self-Awareness -Self-Regulation-Motivation-Empathy-People Skills

Contact Daniel : djamespark@gmail.com

Daniel Park returned to his hometown of Knoxville, TN in 2014. He is an important part of The Nic Nicaud Team at Keller Williams Realty and brings a wide range of real estate experience with him. Daniel’s prior work included residential sales, commercial development, and property management.

Previously, Daniel contributed as a co-founder and manager of Mosaic House in Prague, Czech Republic. Mosaic House is a unique accommodation business specializing in hospitality and “green” technology. As a co-founder, his involvement ranged from design, assisting project management, development of operations, and profit and loss analysis. Following his time in Prague, Daniel served as the Ministry Development Coordinator for Breakaway Ministries at Texas A&M University in College Station, TX.

Daniel earned his B.A. in Psychology in 2006 from Clemson University and is currently working on a Master‘s Degree in Organizational Leadership. He and his wife Brook have three children.

Legacy of Woodstock

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Special Guest

Terry Adams

Adams Law Firm

joins The Housing Hour this week to reflect on one of our countries most iconic weekends ‘ Woodstock ’69’. Terry, Kevin, and Mark discuss the ‘Legacy of Woodstock’ and the impact of the countercultural movement.

Terry has a unique background, having grown up in the Nashville music scene. His mother, Shirley Wood, was a well known and respected country music songwriter. It was not unusual for Terry to find famous musicians in his home growing up.

The Housing Hour reached out to a festival goer and got their first-hand account:

Yes, I was at Woodstock that August in 1969. I was a college sophomore at the time. I remember our decision to go to Woodstock like it was yesterday. I was hanging out with a few of my friends at “The Coral”, a local watering hole on Philly’s Main Line on that Friday night of the concert weekend. I was freshly energized from my trip to the Atlantic City Pop Festival held less than 2 weeks prior. When Woodstock entered the conversation and the great groups that would be performing a snap decision was made. By early the next morning 4 of us were heading north on the PA Turnpike toward Bethel, NY. I recall that it was a warm, sunny day. The perfect day for a road trip – particularly in a GTO convertible with the top down. By the time we hit the NY Thruway it became apparent we were not alone. There was a steady stream of traffic and volume expanded with each mile. By the time we exited the Thruway and merged onto a 2 lane country road the traffic was slowed to a crawl, but honestly, no one seemed to mind. The parade in of itself was a sight to behold: Vans, Microbuses, campers, vehicles painted with all colors and patterns imaginable. American Flags that were in dayglow colors, repurposed school buses, motorcycles and pickup trucks – all loaded with concertgoers! It was when the traffic came to a complete halt, about 4 miles from the venue that we decided to bail on the car. We found a field where I could safely park my car away from the masses and joined in the march. The crowd was massive and like nothing I’d ever seen. No one seemed pushy or annoyed by the press of the people all around them. We all simply merged and moved  forward. By the time we arrived at the entrance the gates were non-existent. In fact there  were no fences or anyone to take tickets and all I could see was a sea of people. I could hear Carlos Santana in the distance. We continued walking toward the music for what may have been another mile before we actually reached our destination and heard that the concert was now “free”. The road was muddy and food vendors parked along the way had mostly closed, having sold out after the first day! I recall being thankful that we brought food & drink in our backpacks. I recall walking past a makeshift Red Cross field hospital that seemed well- organized & pretty low-key. I also recall somehow eventually ending up near the stage in amazement & seeing concertgoers that looked like they had been in a war zone – filthy, many covered in mud and still wet from Friday night’s rainstorm. I recall no one seemed to care & neither did I – we were all together there to enjoy this great music & have a great time!

I could not believe our luck at finding a spot at rear stage left – right under a catwalk where performers walked from the trailers across to the stage. We could both see the performers on stage & hear all of the music. Location, Location, Location & it was not long before we got to know everyone around us – Incredible experience. Canned Heat came on as the sun was setting. They were followed by Mountain, The Grateful Dead and CCR. Credence Clearwater Revival was one of my favorites so I was in my glory. Janis Joplin was followed by Sly & the Family Stone. By then I think it was after 4 am. I think I maybe got 2 hours sleep before The Jefferson Airplane came on & Gracie Slick woke us all up with, “Breakfast for 300,000!”.

During the music, everyone was engaged and euphoric (in more ways than one). It was only after Gracie & the group departed the stage across the catwalk that the massive reality of the event came into view. It would be several hours before the next group would come on – We decided to see if we could grab a spot at the top of the hill as a change of pace but realized pretty quickly this was a bad decision. By the time we did finally reach the top of the hill there was no place to sit. Even if a space could be found you couldn’t see the stage as it was literally standing room only.

So there we were. It was Sunday before noon. We were at the top of the hill and considered options. It was hot. It smelled. I don’t need to mention the thought of portable toilets that crews could not get near to service. No food – we had eaten all we had by Saturday night. And trash everywhere. We looked at each other and unanimously decided, “Time to go”. Well, not everyone. One of our group had run into friends who were staying – he opted to stay and ride home with them.

My car, alone in a field the day before, was now surrounded by a sea of vehicles. I was thankfully able to navigate it through the maze and back onto that country road that led to home. Exhausted with no regrets.

So much has been written about this event – my notes don’t include the kind of stories or insight that hasn’t been written before. Even though 50 years have passed I remain in awe and have to smile at the thought of it all. Nothing was like it ever before or ever since. Just think about it – over 400,000 people together for 3 days under conditions that most people today wouldn’t tolerate for an hour.

Woodstock’s theme was Love & Peace. There’s something to that.

David Crosby had it right: “Love is better than hatred, Peace is better than war”.

Thanks Mark, for asking me to share my Woodstock experience. It gave me an opportunity to put some thought into both my recollections and how much life has changed for us all.

All the best