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General

The Home Energy Audit

The Housing Hour November 28, 2014


NewsTalk 98.7 WOKI Saturday mornings from 8am to 9am

The Home Energy Audit

Special Guest

prudent scott

Host Kevin Rhea Reveals his ‘Home Energy Audit’!

A home energy audit, also known as a home energy assessment, is the first step to assess how much energy your home consumes and to evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient. An assessment will show you problems that may, when corrected, save you significant amounts of money over time.

[embedyt]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YolBP0-vkBU[/embedyt]

ENERGY.GOV

What does this mean for me?

  • An energy assessment will help you pinpoint where you are losing energy
  • The findings from an assessment will help you set your energy priorities
  • You can save 5%-30% on your energy bill by making upgrades following a home energy assessment

The Home Energy Audit

energy_use_piechart-01A home energy assessment (sometimes referred to as an energy audit) will show what parts of your house use the most energy and suggest the best ways to cut energy costs. You can conduct a simple home energy assessment by doing it yourself (DIY) or, for a more detailed assessment, contact your local utility or an energy auditor. Our Energy Saver 101 infographic breaks down a home energy audit, explaining what energy auditors look for and the special tools they use to determine where a home is wasting energy. Also, you can learn more about home energy audits and find free tools and calculators on the Residential Services Network or the Building Performance Institute.

DIY Energy Assessment Tips

  • Check the insulation in your attic, exterior and basement walls, ceilings, floors, and crawl spaces. To determine the insulation R-values in different parts of your home, visit the Air Leaks and Insulation sections.
  • Check for air leaks around your walls, ceilings, windows, doors, lighting and plumbing fixtures, switches, and electrical outlets.
  • Check for open fireplace dampers.
  • Make sure your appliances and heating and cooling systems are properly maintained. Check your owner’s manuals for the recommended maintenance.
  • Study your family’s lighting needs and look for ways to use controls–like sensors, dimmers, or timers–to reduce lighting use.

Your Whole-House Plan
After you know where your home is losing energy, make a plan by asking yourself a few questions:

  • How much money do you spend on energy?
  • Where are your greatest energy losses?
  • How long will it take for an investment in energy efficiency to pay for itself in energy cost savings?
  • Do the energy-saving measures provide additional benefits that are important to you—for example, increased comfort from installing double-paned, efficient windows?
  • How long do you plan to own your current home?
  • Can you do the job yourself or do you need a contractor?
  • What is your budget?
  • How much time do you have for maintenance and repairs?

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