Tag Archives: Dr. Michael L. Simpson

The Legacy of Apollo 11

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Special Guest

Dr. Michael L. Simpson

The University of Tennessee

joins The Housing Hour to discuss the lasting legacy of one America’s most historic feats-“…one giant leap for mankind.” Dr. Simpson brings his vast scientific background to help us unwrap possibly one of the greatest accomplishments the world has ever seen.

Topic Includes:

Where were you?

Mission Facts (Oak Ridge Lab Involvement)

Technology spinoffs

Mars next?

And so much more!

Dr. Simpson earned his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Tennessee in 1983, 1987, and 1991, respectively. His dissertation research focused on charge trapping correction in high-purity germanium radiation detectors. At the time he received his Ph.D. Simpson worked in R&D at EG&G Ortec, and moved to the Scientific Staff of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1992 where he initially worked on the design of high-speed, custom, analog, integrated circuits for collider physics experiments. Later Simpson’s research interest focused more on nanoscale structures, and in particular, on the interface between nanoscale devices and biological systems. Simpson is now a Distinguished Research Staff Member and Theme Leader in the ORNL Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences.  Dr. Simpson began a joint faculty appointment with the University of Tennessee in 1993, first with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and now with the Materials Science and Engineering Department, where he teaches nanobiosciences courses and performs research at the physical-biological sciences boundary.  Dr Simpson has authored or co-authored 115 peer reviewed journal papers, holds 24 U.S. Patents, and has presented numerous invited talks at conferences, workshops, and symposia. Research Areas

(Click each area for more information!)

» Molecular-Scale Engineering and Nanoscale Technologies

» Nanophase Materials Sciences Selected Awards and Honors

2007    Named a Battelle Memorial Institute Distinguished Inventor
1998    Kermit Fischer Environmental Award for the Pioneering Development of an Integrated CMOS Photo-Spectrometer for Wide Applications including Environmental Monitoring.
1998    Finalist for a Discover Magazine Technology Innovation award for the development of the Bioluminescent Bioreporter Integrated Circuit.
1998    Awarded Lockheed-Martin Energy Research Corporation Medal for Excellence in Technical Achievement, for the co-development of a deep submicron lithography method.
1998    Awarded Lockheed-Martin Energy Research Corporation Medal for Excellence in Technical Achievement for the co-development of an integrated circuit for a collider detector application.
1997    Awarded Lockheed-Martin Energy Research Corporation Medal for Excellence in Technical Achievement for the development of a single-chip photo-spectrometer. Professional Activities

» Co-Chair and IEEE-EMBS representative for the second Bio-, Micro-, and Nanosystems Biology Conference sponsored by the American Society of Microbiology and IEEE-EMBS, January 15-18, 2006.

» Co-Chair and IEEE-EMBS representative for the first Bio-, Micro-, and Nanosystems Biology Conference sponsored by the American Society of Microbiology and IEEE-EMBS, July 7-10, 2003.

» Member of the Advisory Committee for the Georgia Tech Conference on Nanosciene and Nanotechnology, 2001

» Member of the Advisory Committee for the Georgia Tech First Conference on Nanosciene and Nanotechnology, October 2000 Selected Publications

M. J. Doktycz and M. L. Simpson, “Nano-enabled synthetic biology,” Mol Syst Biol, vol. 3, 2007.

M. L. Simpson “Cell-free synthetic biology: a bottom-up approach to discovery by design,” Mol. Syst. Biol., vol. 2, 2006.

Austin, D. W., M. S. Allen, J. M. McCollum, R. D. Dar, J. R. Wilgus, G. S. Sayler, N. F. Samatova, C. D. Cox, & M. L. Simpson, “Gene Network Shaping of Inherent Noise Spectra”, Nature 439, Feb. 2, 2006,  608-611.

Melechko, A.V., V.I. Merkulov, T.E. McKnight, M.A. Guillorn, K.L. Klein, D.H. Lowndes, and M.L. Simpson. “Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers and related structures: Controlled synthesis and directed assembly.J. Appl. Phy., 97(4), Feb. 15, 2005, 041301-39.

Fletcher, B. L., E. D. Hullander, A. V. Melechko, T. E. McKnight, K. L. Klein, D. K. Hensley, J. L. Morrell, M. L. Simpson, M. J. Doktycz. “Microarrays of biomimetic cells formed by the controlled synthesis of carbon nanofiber membranes.” Nano Letters 2004,4(10), October 2004, 1809-1814.

M. L. Simpson, C.D. Cox, and G.S. Sayler, “Frequency domain chemical Langevin analysis of stochasticity in gene transcriptional regulation”. J. Theo. Bio. 229(3), August 2004, 383-394.
McKnight, T. E., A. V. Melechko, G. D. Griffin, M. A. Guillorn, V. I. Merkulov, F. Serna, D. K. Hensley, M. J. Doktycz, D. H. Lowndes, and M. L. Simpson. “Intracellular integration of synthetic nanostructures with viable cells for controlled biochemical manipulation.” Nano Letts. 4(7); July 7, 2004, 1213-1219.

M. L. Simpson, C. D. Cox, G. D. Peterson, and G. S. Sayler. “Engineering in the Biological Substrate: Information Processing in Genetic Circuits.” Proc. IEEE. Vol. 92(5), May 2004, 848-863.

Smart Home Technologies Part II

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Special Guest

Dr. Michael L. Simpson

Professor at The University of Tennessee joins The Housing Hour this week to continue our discussion on Smart Home Technologies.  Dr. Simpson brings his superior knowledge and quick, biting whit to make this one of the most informative and fun hours you’ll  spend in a long time.

Dr. Michael L. Simpson is the founding Principal Investigator of the Molecular-Scale Engineering and Nanoscale Technologies (MENT) Research Group currently located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee. He is the Thrust Area Leader for the Nanofabrication Research Laboratory that will be located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) Center for Nanophase Material Science (one of five Department of Energy Nanoscience Research Centers) that began construction in April 2003. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee (UT) in Electrical Engineering in 1991 and is now a UT/ORNL Joint Faculty Member.

Mike’s academic appointments are in the Materials Science and Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering Departments at the rank of Professor, and he is a participating faculty member in the Center for Environmental Biotechnology and Tennessee Advanced Materials Laboratory Research Centers of Excellence. His research interests lie at the intersection of physical and life sciences with a particular focus on the analysis and modeling of information transport in biological systems and the development of molecular-scale interfaces between whole cells and nanostructured synthetic substrates. Mike has authored more than 90 papers and holds nineteen patents.

His papers include Shaping carbon nanostructures by controlling the synthesis process, Frequency domain analysis of noise in autoregulated gene circuits, Alignment mechanism of carbon nanofibers produced by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition, Whole-cell biocomputing, Fabrication of dissimilar metal electrodes with nanometer interelectrode distance for molecular electronic device characterization, Rewiring the cell: synthetic biology moves towards higher functional complexity, and Accelerating Gene Regulatory Network Modeling Using Grid-Based Simulation.

His patents include Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit devices and methods for detecting estrogen, Methods for cell-based combinatorial logic, Controlled non-normal alignment of catalytically grown nanostructures in a large-scale synthesis process, Individually addressable cathodes with integrated focusing stack or detectors, Integrated CMOS spectrometers, Ion beam profile analyzer with noise compensation, Charge trapping correction in photon detector systems, and Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors.

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The New “New” Economy

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Special Guests

Dr. Michael Leon Simpson,

ORNL Scientist / UT Professor

and

R.L. Mitchell, Solar Energy Consultant

 

20160517_101635-1joins The Housing Hour to discuss the future of Work, Transportation, Housing and its relationship to Energy in The New “New” Economy.

Dr. Michael L. Simpson

Professor Ph.D., Tennessee: Semiconductor devices and analog electronic circuits

Brief Bio

Dr. Simpson earned B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Tennessee in 1983, 1987, and 1991, respectively. His dissertation research focused on charge trapping correction in high-purity germanium radiation detectors. At the time he received his Ph.D. Simpson worked in R&D at EG&G Ortec, and moved to the Scientific Staff of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1992 where he initially worked on the design of high-speed, custom, analog, integrated circuits for collider physics experiments. Later Simpson’s research interest focused more on nanoscale structures, and in particular, on the interface between nanoscale devices and biological systems. Simpson is now a Distinguished Research Staff Member and Theme Leader in the ORNL Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences.  Dr. Simpson began a joint faculty appointment with the University of Tennessee in 1993, first with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and now with the Materials Science and Engineering Department, where he teaches nanobiosciences courses and performs research at the physical-biological sciences boundary.  Dr Simpson has authored or co-authored 115 peer reviewed journal papers, holds 24 U.S. Patents, and has presented numerous invited talks at conferences, workshops, and symposia.

R.L. Mitchell – EnergyPro Consulting

His professional staff will provide the guidance you need to make the right decision when it comes to renewable energy.  They provide a full line of consultation services for their customers, from troubleshooting existing systems, expanding existing systems (solar energy systems are very “modular”), to full guidance with all aspects of new installations.

They serve their customers with comprehensive solar site assessments that include site suitability and installation options, shading assessment, installation requirements, financial analysis, purchasing consultation and contractor bid analysis. Their clients satisfaction is their mission so they help you consider system size, fit to your site, budget, building, and environmental goals. They understand the complexities of system integration that can affect your home or business and help you make the decisions that are right for your situation.

They can also help clients make the best choice from solar proposals already in hand. They have intimate knowledge of products, incentives, and finance options and we will review the size, design, and help you choose the products that fit best within your needs and your budget. It is our job to shed light on your many solar options, and most importantly, to save you thousands on your current and future energy needs

Reference Article:

http://www.vox.com/a/new-economy-future

Mercedes home batteries are a potential rival for Tesla’s Powerwall

Dr. Michael L. Simpson

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Scientific Discoveries and Our Future!

Special Guest

simpson_profile_web
Tennessee: Semiconductor devices and analog electronic circuits
Group Leader and Distinguished R&D Staff
Nanofabrication Research Laboratory Group
Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Dr. Simpson earned B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Tennessee in 1983, 1987, and 1991, respectively. His dissertation research focused on charge trapping correction in high-purity germanium radiation detectors. At the time he received his Ph.D. Simpson worked in R&D at EG&G Ortec, and moved to the Scientific Staff of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1992 where he initially worked on the design of high-speed, custom, analog, integrated circuits for collider physics experiments. Later Simpson’s research interest focused more on nanoscale structures, and in particular, on the interface between nanoscale devices and biological systems. Simpson is now a Distinguished Research Staff Member and Theme Leader in the ORNL Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences.  Dr. Simpson began a joint faculty appointment with the University of Tennessee in 1993, first with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and now with the Materials Science and Engineering Department, where he teaches nanobiosciences courses and performs research at the physical-biological sciences boundary.  Dr Simpson has authored or co-authored 115 peer reviewed journal papers, holds 24 U.S. Patents, and has presented numerous invited talks at conferences, workshops, and symposia.

ORNL researchers Simpson, Snead, Tuskan named Corporate Fellows

Michael L. Simpson, Lance L. Snead and Gerald A. Tuskan have been named Corporate Fellows of the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory.Michael L. Simpson, Lance L. Snead and Gerald A. Tuskan have been named Corporate Fellows of the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

OAK RIDGE, Tenn., June 24, 2014 — Michael L. Simpson, Lance L. Snead and Gerald A. Tuskan have been named Corporate Fellows of the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Among the lab’s highest honors, the corporate fellow designation recognizes the researchers’ significant accomplishments and continuing leadership in their scientific, engineering and technological fields. With their addition, the number of active corporate fellows at ORNL is now 29 researchers.

“Our new Corporate Fellows — Mike, Lance and Jerry — are recognized leaders in the fields of nanotechnology, materials research and bioscience, respectively. Their careers represent the span of ORNL research from fundamental science to real-world technologies for the nation’s critical needs in energy and the environment,” said ORNL Director Thom Mason.

Since 2001, Simpson has been a group leader for the Nanofabrication Research Laboratory and theme leader in the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences. His research focus includes noise biology, nano-enabled synthetic biology and controlled synthesis and directed assembly of carbon nanostructures. In 2011, he was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science following his induction into the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biomedical Engineering in 2010 and election as a Fellow of the IEEE in 2008.

Simpson has authored more than 150 peer-reviewed publications, garnering nearly 7,500 citations and has been awarded 34 U.S. patents. He is on an external advisory board for the BATOCOM consortium led by Manchester Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom, and holds a joint faculty position in the material sciences and engineering department at the University of Tennessee, where he received his doctorate in electrical engineering. He is the assistant director for the Joint ORNL/UTK Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Education.

Snead is an associate division director of the Materials Science and Technology Division. In 2012 he received the ORNL Director’s Award for Outstanding Accomplishments in Science and Technology following his 2010 election to fellow status in the American Nuclear Society (ANS) for “being the leading international expert on radiation effects in silicon carbide and other ceramic composites for fusion and advanced fission reactors.” Also in 2010 Snead was elected fellow of the American Ceramic Society (ACS). For his technical contributions he has received numerous society awards including the ANS Mishima and ACS Fulrath awards.

Snead has served as guest editor for a number of journals within his field, publishing more than 210 papers with 4,450 citations. He received his doctorate in nuclear engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1992.

Tuskan is a distinguished scientist in ORNL’s Biosciences Division. His research focuses on the genetic basis of tree growth and development including collaborations on the genome sequences of poplar and, more recently, eucalyptus biofeedstocks. In 2012, he was the fourth award recipient of the Institute of Forest Biotechnology’s Forest Biotechnologist of the Year.

Tuskan received his bachelor’s degree in forest management from Northern Arizona University, master’s in forest genetics from Mississippi State University and doctorate in genetics from Texas A&M University. He has written over 154 journal articles with 7,975 citations.

UT-Battelle manages ORNL for the Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit http://science.energy.gov/.